Meeting Investors

19.01.2016 |

Episode #7 of the course “A guide to seed fundraising” by Geoff Ralston, Y Combinator

 

If you are meeting investors at an investor day, remember that your goal is not to close–it is to get the next meeting. Investors will seldom choose to commit the first day they hear your pitch, regardless of how brilliant it is. So book lots of meetings. Keep in mind that the hardest part is to get the first money in the company. In other words, meet as many investors as possible but focus on those most likely to close. Always optimize for getting money soonest (in other words, be greedy).

There are a few simple rules to follow when preparing to meet with investors.

First, make sure you know your audience–do research on what they like to invest in and try to figure out why. Second, simplify your pitch to the essential–why this is a great product (demos are almost a requirement nowadays), why you are precisely the right team to build it, and why together you should all dream about creating the next gigantic company.

Next make sure you listen carefully to what the investor has to say. If you can get the investor to talk more than you, your probability of a deal skyrockets. In the same vein, do what you can to connect with the investor. This is one of the main reasons to do research. An investment in a company is a long term commitment and most investors see lots of deals. Unless they like you and feel connected to your outcome, they will most certainly not write a check.

Who you are and how well you tell your story are most important when trying to convince investors to write that check. Investors are looking for compelling founders who have a believable dream and as much evidence as possible documenting the reality of that dream.

Find a style that works for you, and then work as hard as necessary to get the pitch perfect. Pitching is difficult and often unnatural for founders, especially technical founders who are more comfortable in front of a screen than a crowd. But anyone will improve with practice, and there is no substitute for an extraordinary amount of practice. Incidentally, this is true whether you are preparing for a demo day or an investor meeting.

During your meeting, try to strike a balance between confidence and humility. Never cross over into arrogance, avoid defensiveness, but also don’t be a pushover. Be open to intelligent counterpoints, but stand up for what you believe and whether or not you persuade the investor just then, you’ll have made a good impression and will probably get another shot.

Lastly, make sure you don’t leave an investor meeting without an attempted close or at very minimum absolute clarity on next steps. Do not just walk out leaving things ambiguous.

 

Recommended book

“The Art of the Pitch: Persuasion and Presentation Skills that Win Business” by P. Coughter

 

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